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Beef Udon Noodle Soup

Beef Udon Noodle Soup

One of the absolute best things about living in Seattle is the insane amount of GOOD Asian food there is. There is an awesome International District, and scattered throughout the remaining metro area are literally thousands of restaurants and markets for just about every country and region. Since living here, I have found that I have an addiction to Asian noodle soups. Seriously. I can’t get enough Pho Ba. Spicy Ramen is my jam. I will fight someone for some Tom Kha Gai, and I absolutely love love love Udon Noodle soup.

I didn’t know this about me until about two years ago, and it’s something that is becoming kind of concerning considering the fact that in a few short months, Joe and I will be making the move out East for my PhD. I’ll admit something very pretentious and probably wrong, but I’m skeptical of the Asian food selection out there. I’ve become spoiled knowing that for $5-$10, I can get my fix without any work. Upon coming to that realization, I made it a mission to learn how to make these soups so that I won’t die of withdrawal. My first attempt was Beef Udon noodle soup, and I am so proud because it was a SUCCESS!



Last weekend, Joe and hit up an Asian market after a bit of spring cleaning. If you know me, it should come as zero surprise that I can spend hours (and good portion of a paycheck) in Asian supermarkets. Fortunately, they are incredibly cheap, but I have zero self control — I’ll come home with some kind of root, an unmarked spice bag, and no idea what the hell to do with either of them.  Joe knows this, and made me swear that before going in, I would limit myself to $20 and $20 minutes.  I really didn’t think I could do it, but I did! I went in as a woman on a mission, and only came out with 4 things not on the list. (I’m a sucker for pocky, iced green jasmine tea, and frozen dumplings). But I found what I was looking for, and that was the ingredients for a good Beef Udon soup! Fun fact — buy your produce, seafood, and meat from your local Asian market. The prices are usually cheaper, and depending on the store, the quality is still great!



Bok Choy


Onwards to the actual recipe! If you’ve ever had any type of Japanese soup, you know that the broth, usually Dashi, is a huge part of it. Fish “flake” based, it is salty, savory, and slightly sweet flavor — making this broth the perfect example of Umami, one of the 5 basic tastes. I find the science behind taste EXTREMELY interesting, and it is something I am considering writing a whole series on, but for now, just take my word that this taste, is an awesome flavor. For this batch, I cheated. I didn’t have the patience (this time) to make the broth from scratch, so I bought a packet of Hon Dashi to compensate. I was a bit hesitant to use a box packet for broth, but I was pleasantly surprised — I guess it makes sense since this is the most widely used “alternative” to the real thing. Once I added in the other key ingredients, Mirin, Soy, and Sugar, it tasted close to the real thing!


Pour


To make this soup a bit heartier, I wanted to add some beef, so I went with a Round Steak that was on sale at the market (so I could meet my budget). Full disclosure, I did NOT cut my meat thin enough, and in hindsight, I would have used a more tender and less cheap cut of meat, like tenderloin. A simple marinade using Mirin, Soy, Garlic, Rice Wine Vinegar, and sugar made it awesome nonetheless. In addition to the meat, we used store-bought Udon noodles that were simple to use, as well as some lightly sautéed brown mushrooms, various cuts of leek, and a quick-blanched bok choy that rounded it all out! Topped with a poached egg, this soup really hit the spot — and since Joe and I were both coming down with a pre-Spring cold, I think it may have had some healing properties too. Give it a shot, and let me know what you think!


Beef Marinating


Drink with: Warm Sake or green tea.

Pair with: This soup is totally good by itself. If you want to add something else, a nice salad with a sesame-ginger dressing would do the trick.


Beef Udon Noodle Soup

2017-03-26
: 2
: 30 min
: 30 min
: 1 hr
: Medium

Hearty noodles in a savory broth will curb your Japanese cravings and soothe your soul!

By:

Ingredients
  • 2 Packs Precooked Udon Noodles.
  • 1 Large Leek
  • BROTH
  • 4C Water
  • 2T Hon Dashi Stock
  • 3-4T Soy Sauce
  • 2T Soy
  • 2T Mirin
  • 2t Sugar
  • 1/2t Salt
  • 2T Leek (Bottom part sliced into thin rounds)
  • BEEF
  • 1lb Beef, thinly sliced
  • 3T Soy Sauce
  • 2T Mirin
  • 1T Rice Vinegar
  • 1T Rice Wine (optional)
  • 2 Cloves garlic, minced
  • 2t Minced Leek (green top part)
  • 2t Sugar
  • FIXINGS
  • 4 Baby Bok Choys, separated
  • 6 Mushrooms, quartered
  • 2 Eggs, poached
  • Julienned Leek (middle part)
Directions
  • Step 1 Marinate Beef: Add all ingredients to bowl, stir, and then stir in thinly sliced beef. Cover and refrigerate for at least 30 minutes.
  • Step 2 Make Broth: Boil 4 cups of water. Add in Hon Dash powder. Stir to dissolve.
  • Step 3 Add in Soy Sauce, Mirin, sugar and salt. Drop heat to a low simmer.
  • Step 4 In another large pot, bring 6C water to a boil.
  • Step 5 Add Box Choy, and cook for one minute. Remove without dumping water, and run under cold water. Set aside on paper towels to drain.
  • Step 6 In same pot, cook the noodles for 1 minute. Drain and run under cold water. Set aside.
  • Step 7 Heat 2t oil in a large skillet over high heat. Add beef, and cook for 2 minutes on each side. Remove meat, and drain any excess liquid, keeping the browned bits.
  • Step 8 In the same pan you used for the meat, add in 1t of oil, and turn to high heat. Quickly sauté the noodles, for one minute. Divide between bowls.
  • Step 9 In the same pan, flash-fry the mushrooms and julienned leek for 2 minutes. Drop heat, add the Bok Choy, and cook for 1 minute. Remove from heat.
  • Step 10 Pour broth over noodles, and top with beef, veggies, and a poached or soft boiled egg!
  • Step 11 Enjoy!
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Earl Grey Cream Scones with Lavender Honey Butter and Mock “Devonshire Cream”

Earl Grey Cream Scones with Lavender Honey Butter and Mock “Devonshire Cream”

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The Only Lasagna

The Only Lasagna

Okay, so confession time: I absolutely love Lasagna. It’s one of those dishes that no matter my current diet status, I will drop everything and run to the table. I am a sucker for tomato sauce, and a glutton for anything browned and cheesy. Growing up, I always thought Lasagna was some sacred dish that is complicated and time consuming to make, so I never really had it much as a kid. It wasn’t until I went to Italy and had lasagna made by some guy’s grandmother did I realize my life would be forevermore incomplete without it. Thus began my recipe experimentation, and after years of messing with it, I think I’ve got it. While it does take some time to prepare, it is certainly not difficult.

There’s kind of a funny history to this recipe. The first time I made it, it was for my dad’s 60th birthday party for about 30 people. My dad is vehemently anti-onion, so I had to have two different pots of sauce going. That night, a fabulous family friend (who is more family than friend) was in attendance, and fell in love with it. He asked for the recipe, and has since served it at a lot of his gatherings– so much so that my lasagna is known as “Ricky’s Lasagna” in some Palm Springs circles. Obviously, I am 100% okay with that because it is so yummy and I want EVERYONE to eat and share it!

In Seattle, we have a friend named Kevin that has some kind of psychic skill and can sense when I am even thinking about making it. Since meeting him, he has been invited to every Lasagna night we’ve had, and like my dad, he also dislikes cooked onions, so the dual sauce continues. My sister-in-law’s boyfriend doesn’t eat pork, so I’ve made it that way too. Fortunately, this recipe is super adaptable which adds to its awesomeness.

I’m sure I sound a bit boastful, but this recipe really is good, and easy too! I won’t lie to you and say it is quick, because it certainly isn’t that–but it is something you can start and walk away from, or even just prepare in advance and pop in the fridge or freezer until you’re ready to eat it.  Ultimately, I believe that making lasagna is an act of love, and I think all of the extra steps make for a better finished product. Trust me, you’ll be happy with your effort.

The secret, not shockingly, is in the sauce–and it is it so full of flavor! Fortunately, this recipe makes quite a bit of it, so you can make an extra lasagna, serve it on the side for the sauce fiends at the table, or even  water it down a bit for spaghetti later in the week. You can even add in extra veggies like mushrooms or fresh herbs, whatever you have on hand, to make it a bit more hearty. The possibilities are endless, but the lasagna itself won’t be. Sadly. The good news is that I often end up making 1.5 lasagnas with this recipe, and freeze the uneaten half to pull out for an easy weeknight dinner.

I think one of the things that separates this recipe from the millions of others is 1) The spices, and 2) The fact that it actually has enough of the ricotta layer in it. So may lasagnas skimp on that creamy goodness, and I think that the sweet and cheesy layer is an absolute must have in any lasagna. It is there to cut the acidity and saltiness of the sauce, and also add a little bit of lightness to a naturally heavy dish. Besides, who doesn’t like a bit of extra cheese? I certainly don’t mind.

Also, you’ll notice that my ricotta layer utilizes two eggs over the usual one. If I’m being honest, I’ve used three before, too. Really, it just depends on the ricotta you buy: If you opt for a low fat option, you’ll definitely need the extra egg to keep it thick and creamy.

Ultimately, lasagna is one of those things that everyone agrees that they love it, but tend to disagree on the best recipe and method of preparation. Below, you’ll find my recipe, and I hope you enjoy it!

Eat with: A fresh tossed green salad and crunchy bread or homemade focaccia!

Drink with: A yummy Italian red wine — We opted for Chianti, but a nice Barolo is never a bad idea.

The Only Lasagna

2017-03-18
: 12ish
: 30 min
: 4 hr
: 4 hr 30 min
: Medium

By:

Ingredients
  • 1 box lasagna noodles
  • 1.5 pounds grated mozzarella
  • ½ cup fresh grated parmesan
  • SAUCE
  • 1 pound ground beef
  • 1 pound mild Italian sausage
  • 2 tsp olive oil
  • 1 medium yellow onion, diced
  • 6 cloves garlic, crushed then minced
  • 15 oz can of tomato sauce
  • 12 oz tomato paste
  • 28 oz diced tomatoes (I prefer Fire Roasted for this recipe)
  • 1 tbs salt (or more to taste)
  • 1 tbs sugar (or more depending on acidity)
  • 1 tsp black pepper
  • 2 tsp dried basil
  • 2 tsp dried oregano
  • 1 tsp thyme
  • ½ tsp crushed red pepper flakes
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 6 oz pasta water to thin, if needed
  • RICOTTA LAYER
  • 30 oz Whole Milk Ricotta
  • 2 eggs
  • ½ tsp black pepper
  • 1 handful of fresh basil minced
Directions
  • Step 1 In a Dutch Oven or large pot, cook the Italian sausage and ground beef until almost cooked through over medium heat. Drain fat and set aside.
  • Step 2 Add 2 tsp olive oil to the bottom of a pan and add in the onions. Cook about five minutes and add in garlic. Cook for another two minutes taking care to not burn the garlic.
  • Step 3 Return meat to pan and mix in the tomato paste and stir. Cook for 1-2 minutes.
  • Step 4 Add canned tomatoes and sauce and stir.
  • Step 5 Mix in all of the herbs and spices and bring to a heavy simmer for 10 minutes.
  • Step 6 Drop the heat and simmer on low and cook for 2-3 hours.
  • Step 7 Take off heat, remove bay leaf, and set aside.
  • Step 8 Cook lasagna noodles according to package (I usually use 9-12 noodles for one pan). You want them to be al dente. Reserve 6oz of cooking water, and drain the remaining. Run noodles under cold water when finished.
  • Step 9  Stir together ricotta and eggs. You want it to be fluffy, so put some work into it. Then mix in pepper and basil. Set Aside.
  • Step 10  Now that your sauce has cooled slightly, check it. If it is too thick, stir in some of the pasta water. Note: You want a thicker sauce, but you also want it to spread a bit too.
  • Step 11 Preheat oven to 375°.
  • Step 12 In the bottom of a 9×13 inch pan, spoon a couple of tablespoons of sauce.
  • Step 13 Lay out noodles (each layer for me was about 3 noodles)
  • Step 14 Spread ricotta mixture liberally.
  • Step 15 Spoon on sauce.
  • Step 16 Top with Mozzarella
  • Step 17 Repeat Steps 13-15 until you’re close to the top of the dish. Your last layer before adding the final cheese should be sauce.
  • Step 18 Top with remaining mozzarella and parmesan.
  • Step 19  To Cook:* Cover pan with foil and cook for 30 minutes. Remove foil and cook for another 30 to get a browned top. You can broil for a minute or two to get a really browned top, but be sure to keep an eye on it!
  • Step 20 Cool for 10 minutes, and serve with remaining sauce, salad, and bread!

*If you are cooking a previously frozen lasagna: Bake covered at 400° for an hour and a half. Uncover for remaining 10-15 minutes and broil if need be. Internal temperature should read 165* at least.

 

 

 

Spicy Steak and Kale Caesar

Spicy Steak and Kale Caesar

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Pomelo Tequila Spritzer

Pomelo Tequila Spritzer

It’s no secret that I love anything tequila, and I have deep seated passion for grapefruit and similar fruits. This drink combines the best of both worlds, and it is a refreshing accompaniment to Mexican dishes, or anything spicy. While this recipe calls for pomelo, you […]